Shared NDE

This video illustrates a rare and wondrous occurrence: a shared NDE.

Come along now and listen to Scott Taylor describe his shared experience of death when his nephew dies.

It is just another example of how mystical and magical life is; and how life-altering it is to discover that death is just another step along life’s path.

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DEATH – Why Does It Frighten Us So?

Death.

That word probably frightens people more than any other.

Why?

Because it represents the ‘great unknown.’ We know less about death than we do about outer space or the deep recesses of Earth’s oceans. After all, it’s not easy to explore a dimension or state of being that requires us to cease living. So, for most of us, death becomes the area that, like on maps of old, was marked with the words: ‘There be monsters here.’

Monsters. Demons. Angels.

 

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These are what we think of when we think about death, because that’s all we know, or at least suspect, based on the stories that we are told about the land of beyond. Of course, some people eschew the typical concept of death being a place or a continuation of some form of life. Instead, they see death as a black nothingness. Still others divide the realm of death into two states: one where demons and monsters abide, and another where angels and cherubs live.

Proof.

Of course, trying to prove if there is a type of life after the physical body dies isn’t easy to do. After all, how do you gather statistics and measurements when you have no physical form? It is just this conundrum that has plagued most of us who have died and returned. We have garnered little acceptance from the scientific community regarding our experiences simply because we lack the physical proof of what occurred. All we have is our memory of the events, and even those vary widely based on each person’s interpretation. For instance, for someone who is a strict Catholic, the experience may be interpreted through the filter of their Catholic iconography and tenets; while, someone who is an atheist may describe their experience using a filter of science or space aliens.

Some experiments have been conducted. They are usually of the sort wherein someone is forced into a chemically- or electronically-induced death, and then revived within the time limits deemed safe. While these experiments are done within the confines of labs and under the supervision of ‘specialists,’ the interpretation of what did or did not occur on the ‘other side’ (if indeed, the other side was even reached) is still up to the individual who died.

The specialists monitoring the physical side of the experiment can note data on the ‘traveler’s’ body—heart rate, brain waves, blood pressure, etc.—however, they are unable to experience what the traveler who died experienced. Scientists can site all types of speculation and theories to explain what may or may not have happened—low oxygen levels in the brain, random electrical pulses, or a bad interpretation of what was happening around the person who was ‘dead’—but without proof of whether or not the dead person actually traveled their suppositions are as bogus as their disdain of what the travelers experienced.

Been There.

Having made the roundtrip at least once in this lifetime, I suppose that until we devise some sort of carrier to ferry us (the physical us) into the realm of death and back, we will simply have to rely on our own beliefs and truths as to what awaits us when we die.

To that end, I have written my interpretation of my experiences with the hope that they help people overcome some of their fear of Death. Death isn’t anything to fear. It’s merely another step along life’s path.

 

Oooh, a new marketing toy…

I couldn’t sleep last night, so I decided to use my time to research ways of incorporating blatant ads into my blog. I know, I know…no one likes commercials. But let’s face it, if I don’t push my books, who will?

I may never make a living off of them, but I’m still proud of them, and want to share the information. So, I tried creating a short audio…I know the quality’s not great, but I thought I did pretty well for being over tired, bleary-eyed, and up waaaay past my bedtime.

try this

I also played around with a free presentation software available from Google. The results are fairly basic, and hardly of the quality of most of the vids available on YouTube, but then again, it’s my first attempt, too. So, have listen, take a look…

Book synopsis

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What Dreams May Come…What Dreams Have Come

WhatdreamsposterA friend of mine invited me to watch a movie with her. She said it was something she had seen when it first came out and, knowing I hadn’t seen it, thought I would really enjoy it. That’s all she said. She wouldn’t give me the title, tell me who starred in it, or even give me a synopsis of the plot. Deciding to humor her (and wanting to spend time with her, anyway), I agreed to her “movie night”.

The movie she chose was “What Dreams May Come” starring Robin Williams. And to say I was surprised by the movie is an understatement. It was like watching my own book, “Escorting the Dead: My Life as a Psychopomp”, come to life.

The movie was based on a book by Richard Matheson, author of such books as “Bid Time Return” (which became the movie, “Somewhere in Time”) and “I am Legend” (which also became a movie with the same name). I had loved all the movies made from Mr. Matheson’s books, including this one that I had just seen, so I went to the library and got copies of his books.

Reading his words pulled at something deep within me. It waCover3s as if we were connecting on a soul level. It made me wonder just who was Mr. Matheson and how did he come to write these books; what was his inspiration. Did he have a near death experience of his own? Was his just a finely tuned imagination or was there some “secret” knowledge there?

What I found was that he wasn’t all that different from me in his beliefs and in how he built his spiritual foundations.

Fascinated by parapsychology, the paranormal, and metaphysics since boyhood, Mr. Matheson used his storytelling platform to explore and express his beliefs. Having read everything from Emanual Swedenborg and Harold Percival to Raymond Moody and Kubler-Ross, Mr. Matheson compiled his own spiritual belief system which he published in a book called “The Path”, a non-fiction account of his ideas and concepts.

That same belief system was used as the basis for “What Dreams May Come” but was expressed as a story; however, in an introductory note to the book, Matheson explains that the characters are the only fictional component of the novel. Almost everything else was based on research, and the end of the novel includes a lengthy bibliography.

Placing the material in a fictional, story-like format allowed Mr. Matheson to reach a wider audience with his ideas of how life (and death) works. His book explores a range of paranormal and spiritual concepts and puts forth his philosophy of mind over matter, that ideas are the basis of creation, and his beliefs that the human soul is immortal and that a person’s fate in the afterlife is self-imposed.

The book, which was originally published in 1978, received mixed reviews. However, Mr. Matheson considered it one of his greatest achievements and was quoted as saying, “I think ‘What Dreams May Come’ is the most important (read effective) book I’ve written. It has caused a number of readers to lose their fear of death – the finest tribute any writer could receive.”

That quote also fits me. I may not sell very many copies of my book, but that’s okay; because if my book can give even one person some comfort regarding their death or the death of someone they love, than that’s what counts. It’s really the reason why I wrote it.

So, in our own way, I guess Mr. Matheson and I do have a connection. We both developed similar belief systems and have tried to express those beliefs through our writing. It’s nice to have validation of how you think the world functions, and it’s even nicer when that validation comes to you unexpectedly and without strings.

I see you…

Can people really view objects, locations, and people from a distance (remote viewing), or allow part of themselves to travel away from their body to some other place (out of body experiences)? The American and Russian governments believe so (Stargate was a real project within the US military and it was geared toward finding, training, and using people with these talents). And now, finally, the scientists are coming around to believing this, too.

Studies of the mind have identified a particular region of the brain associated with spatial recognition. In other words, there is a part of your brain that helps you fix yourself within a specific time and space; it keeps you within a specific reality. However, some people have the ability to control that aspect of their brain, to turn it off and on at will.

With it turned off, a person is no longer situated just where their body is. Instead, a part of them (let’s call it their awareness) is able to expand outward to any given coordinates whether on Earth or in space. These people have given accurate reports as to what they saw, heard, and experienced, yet their bodies never left the researcher’s sight. A rare few of these “travelers” or “viewers” have even been able to sense emotions of those in the target area, and some have reported being able to actually touch people and things in the target area (confirmed by contacting the target people who said they felt a push or hug during the experiment).

These studies have used MRI’s and brain scans during the travel and viewing experiments, which have shown the parts of the brains that were triggered. Each time the participant claimed to have launched themselves free of their bodies, the spatial recognition area of their brains has been shut down, and it didn’t come back on until the participants were “back”. During their travels, various other portions of the mind triggered, such as the visual cortex, even though the physical body had its eyes closed. All of which, the scientists claim shows that something real is happening and that while the body remains fixed in place, the mind (and perhaps more than the mind) has traveled somewhere else.

However, other scientists have shown that the brain can be fooled. By having the participants wear virtual reality goggles, these scientists have shown that substitute bodies (such as mannequins) can be used to fool the participants into believing what they’re not really experiencing. Scientists have positioned mannequins or other false body parts (arms or legs) in such a way that when the participants with the goggles see them being poked or swatted, they reach for their own stomach, arm, leg or body area and state that they felt the swat, poke, or prod. Yet, the scientists never touched the actual participant.

But fooling the brain into thinking that another [fake] body is your own body isn’t the same as actually describing a location across the globe that you’ve never been to. We all know that the brain is not infallible. It’s only as good as the input it receives. If presented with a perspective that the brain cannot quite understand, the brain will supply answers based on past experience and current input. That may not be accurate, but it’s the only data the brain has, so that’s what it goes with.

Unfortunately, this does affect the results of any remote viewing or out of body experience. What you see when you “travel” may not be something you can easily comprehend, it may not be visually clear (almost everyone who remote views or who steps out of body, claims that their vision becomes foggy or cloudy—maybe because we’re no longer using our physical eyes and senses to see a physical world), and it has to travel through our own personal filters (prejudices and beliefs). Therefore, while I believe it’s possible, it’s also not always easy to explain or quantify. It’s like everything else in this world…uniquely personal and individually distinctive.

What was it?

Riding my bike past the golf course, I watch as the van runs the stop sign; however, I’m unable to swerve out of his way. I’m staring through the van’s windshield at the driver and hoping he doesn’t hit his brakes. He does, though, and now I’m flying. It’s an odd sensation to be sailing through the air like some sort of awkward flightless bird.

I don’t remember hitting the pavement because I am distracted by the intensely bright column of white light shining out of the top of my body’s head. I have only a moment to grasp that I’m outside of my body, and then, swoosh! I’m sucked up the column of light like an envelope in a pneumatic mail tube.

I’m standing in a place of love. It’s completely enveloping, and I’m thoroughly immersed in feelings of loving acceptance, calmness, and of being home (of belonging).

There’s a glow of golden light ahead of me in the distance, and I need and want to get there. But as I take a step forward, a golden being blocks my way and a ball of blue white light hovers near my shoulder. I sense a type of musical speech emanating from both of the beings. I find the music pretty, yet disturbing at the same time, so I try not to listen to what it is saying. Instead, I focus on moving forward toward the glowing horizon and the feelings of acceptance and love that I feel even more strongly coming from there.

Now the glowing orb is in front of me, and it lightly touches my forehead. Very distinctly the singing evolves into words and feelings. The words are, “it’s not your time,” while the feelings are of sorrow and apology. It’s telling me that something has changed, that my plans must be altered and I can’t leave yet. Disappointment fills my very soul. I don’t want to go; I want to soar, I want to fly, I want to sing.

“Later,” it says; “later, we promise.” 

I’m devastated. I don’t want to go back. I want to stay in this place of love. “No, please — I want to stay…” I think back to it.

And suddenly there is a horrible shrieking sound that pierces my head.

I’m back in my body, which is lying on the street, and I’m screaming. There are EMTs and other people hovering around me, and the driver of the van is on his cell phone.

I was only gone for a few seconds, maybe a minute, yet it seemed longer, and the feelings of disappointment, of missing out on something stupendous, were strong and have stayed with me for a looooong time.

I need and want to get back (to stay), but until then the short trips I now take seem to help me. Each time I’ve stepped over the barrier between this life and that it’s been to help someone who is dying. Since the accident I’ve found myself acting as a “guide” to those crossing over. I understand their fears, and it has helped me overcome mine, too. My fear was that it wasn’t real, that it was a dream and that I’d never get that loving feeling back. But I can, and I do, and that has helped me overcome the horrible disappointment I felt in having to come back

I now know that I can cross over there and experience those feelings again and again, and once I’m done with my life here, I know what’s waiting for me, so I’m not afraid. And I’m not afraid to help others with their fears, either.

Was it an NDE or was it a simple hallucination created by me in response to the accident? I know what I believe, but what do you think? Care to comment?

[For other stories of NDEs please see the International Association for Near Death Studies.]

Be the butterfly

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Like a butterfly,
I burst free from the cocoon.
I soar into life,
A life of the soul without physicality.

From caterpillar,
To cocoon,
From life,
To death.

But death is not all;
There is more beyond.
There is love,
There is acceptance,
There is life – again.

Soar with me
And see the beauty.
Bathe in the glow
Of the light of pure love.

Spread your wings
And be the butterfly
You were always meant to be,
As we move from life to death to life once more.

Dedicated to Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and her journey in life, death, and life beyond. Check out her books “On Life After Death”, “Life After Life”, “The Tunnel and the Light”, and “Questions and Answers on Death and Dying”, to name just four.