We’ve All Lived Before

pexels-photo-346796.jpegI did a review on a book regarding children and past lives, and while the book wasn’t all that great, the topic is still one that interests me.

One of the reasons it interests me is because of my own remembrances of past lives (some from when I was young and other memories that have occurred at different moments throughout my life). Another reason why the subject interests me, though, is because of several occurrences I’ve had of coping with the spontaneous recall of other’s memories.

The first time I had to help someone else cope with such a spontaneous memory was when I was in my late teens/early 20’s. I was babysitting my nieces and nephews (ages 9 to 4). This was a typical request and I wasn’t expecting anything unusual.

The kids (3 boys and 2 girls) were outside playing in the backyard, the dog was lying in the shade of the big ol’ oak tree, and I was just trying to make sure that they didn’t kill themselves or each other with their antics. Two of the boys were trying to climb the tree, while the two girls were having a tea party with their dolls over by the swing set.

52205_soarSuddenly, the third boy, and the youngest, burst into tears. Thinking that one of the other kids had done something, I raced over to see what was wrong (the other kids continued to play, paying us no mind).

Donny (not his real name) was squatting near the tree, tears just streaming down his face. When I got there, he appeared inconsolable. I got down next to him and wrapped my arms around him. As his tears slowed down a bit, I asked him what was wrong.

He choked out the words, “I did it.”

“Did what?”

He pointed at the dead bird at the base of the tree.

I hadn’t seen him hurt anything, but then I was trying to keep track of five energetic and crazy kids. So, without thinking, I asked, “Why did you kill it?”

“Because my dad told me to.”

I stood up, surprised, because I knew his dad would never do such a thing. After a moment, I squatted back down. “Are you sure it was your dad who suggested it?”

“Oh, he didn’t just suggest it; he insisted.” (Insisted was the word he used, speaking at a level above his age of four.)

Still puzzled, I pushed for more information. “Do you know why he insisted you do this?” And I indicated the dead bird.

Continuing to speak in a way that was older than his four years, he responded, “He said I would be considered a pantywaist if I didn’t.”

Okay, I knew something was odd, because who says ‘pantywaist?’ That was definitely not a term his father would use.

“Your dad told you that?”

He blinked, then said, “Not this dad. The dad I had before.”

“You had a dad before this one?”

“Sure. But that was when I was Robert Aikers.” (Again, not actual name.)

That got me. I plopped down on the ground and stared at him.

“My dad at that time thought it was manly to kill things, but I didn’t approve. So, he mocked me until I finally went hunting with him. We came across a partridge nest in the west field.

“I didn’t want to do it, but I finally pulled the trigger, killing the mother partridge.

“I felt so badly afterwards that I snuck out for weeks to take care of the babies. When he found out, he went out to the field and stomped the nest flat. Then, he made me leave the babies to the barn cat.

“I hated him after that.”

To say I was surprised, is a gross understatement. But I pulled myself together and tried to help him through the experience. I explained that he had taken responsibility for his actions back then by trying to help the baby birds, and it wasn’t his fault that his father had killed them. I also told him that hating his father from back then was a waste of energy. His father had had different values at that time, and eventually he would come to understand that killing for the sake of killing was harmful to himself and the environment. Until then, Donny/Robert needed to forgive himself and his father and move on from that life.

I then explained that the dead bird now was not Donny’s fault. That he hadn’t caused the bird to fall from the tree. I then suggested that we dig a grave for it and bury it along with his anger for his past father.

Once we buried the bird, Donny went back to being Donny and he never mentioned Robert Aikers again (at least, not to me).

So, while some people need help to remember and use meditation, hypnosis, or regression therapy; others, sometimes spontaneously remember. While these spontaneous memories can lead to catharsis, they can also (sometimes) trap the person in a mental time warp loop. The person can get caught up in the memories and emotions from the past and find it difficult or impossible to move forward in their current life.

What they need is someone to help talk them through the memory so that they can let go of whatever emotion or fear is holding them back. Even if they can’t work through the memory (especially if the fear is too great), if they can just let it go it can be enough to help them get back to their current life.

So, sometimes the best way to help someone when they have a spontaneous past life that threatens to take over their current life, is to tell them to let it go. Let it go until another life or until they’re between lives.

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Available at most online book vendors.

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“A compilation of book reports with anecdotes”

CarolBowmanBookChildren’s Past Lives by Carol Bowman

Summary: Has your child lived before?

In this book, Carol Bowman reveals overwhelming evidence of past life memories in children. Not only are such experiences real, they are far more common than most people realize.

Bowman’s extraordinary investigation was sparked when her young son, Chase, described his own past-life death on a Civil War battlefield; an account so accurate it was authenticated by an expert historian. Even more astonishing, Chase’s chronic eczema and phobia of loud noises completely disappeared after he had the memory.

Inspired by her son’s dramatic healing, Bowman compiled dozens of cases and wrote this comprehensive study to explain how very young children remember their past lives, spontaneously and naturally. In this book, Ms. Bowman tells how to distinguish between a true past life memory and a fantasy, offers practical advice to parents on how to respond to a child recalling a past life memory, and shows how to foster the spiritual and healing benefits of these experiences.

Recommendation: Mixed feelings (In Amazon’s world, maybe 1.5 to 2 stars)

Review:  If you enjoy reading anecdotes of people recalling past lives, then you’ll find the book mildly interesting. If, however, you want a book that truly provides evidence and science-based research into past lives, then this book is not for you.

The first half of the book is little more than a compilation of book reports, which in its own way was helpful to me, only because I didn’t have to go far to find a list of better resources for what I wanted (science-based information on reincarnation). The author condensed each of her reference books into a synopsis and summary of the main topics, and then wrote that up as separate chapters for her own book. She then borrowed one or two anecdotes from the reference book and incorporated that into said chapter. This made it quite helpful for me to determine which of those reference books I wanted to use to gain more insight into this topic.

(I do understand that she was doing this to show her readers that she had done her homework, and wasn’t just a silly housewife writing a book. However, this material should have been included simply as a bibliography, not as chapters in her book. Although, without these as chapters, she wouldn’t have had a book, since they did make up a little more than half her total page count.)

The second half of her book was divided into two sections. The first, contained snippets from her own life and family struggles in figuring out how to write the book while attending conferences and symposiums that would help her gain notoriety and aid her to launch her career as a regression therapist. The second, contained the instructions for parents on how to handle their children who may be remembering past lives.

The whole theme running through her narrative is that this book will help parents deal with their children’s sudden past life memory eruptions. Yet, that information garnered only twenty or so pages at the very end of the book.

So, if you’re looking for other materials to read with more science and more depth, then read the first half of the book for her book reports. If you’re looking for an anecdotal biography of Carol Bowman, then try the first part of the second half of the book. And, if what you really need is some help recognizing when your child is spouting information about a past life he or she may have lived, then try the last few pages. The author does present some fairly sound common-sense ways to tell whether your child is making up stories or actually remembering something from a previous life. However, on the whole, I would give this book a pass and find one that is more comprehensive and useful.

Telling the Story

psychopomp-3d-dls-8pxls-2Do you know the difference between a novel and a non-fiction book? A non-fiction book is based in truth. However, the biggest mistake that non-fiction authors make is equating truth with a dry recitation of facts rather than the telling of a story. Despite your history teacher’s attempts to bore you with lists of dates and tables of facts, history can (and is) actually interesting. People want to know why something happened or why someone acted or reacted as they did. They want to understand the reason for events, and that’s where your story telling ability comes in. You need to show them why; you need to give them the story surrounding the event.

All stories, both fiction and non-fiction, are just that—stories. When writing a memoir, biography, or other bit of non-fiction, you still need to follow the same guidelines as an author writing a novel; however, you have a major advantage. Your story is already loosely defined for you. You have the timeline, timeframe, characters, major conflicts, and key dramatic elements, all you need to do is add the story components.

You need to develop your characters so that your readers can see them the way you do—are they shy, dynamic, geeky, or ne’er do well? The characters need depth, life, purpose, and motivation to go along with that dramatic moment. Does the moment you’re recording have to do with star-crossed lovers, a robbery gone wrong, a heroic deed, or just a crazy moment that changed the character’s life? You also need to build up the environment. What was the time period like, the culture, and the society? Help your readers understand your character’s perspectives, actions, and reactions. (For instance, the American culture and societal mores are much different today than they were in the 1970’s and understanding that can help the reader connect with the character and their plight.)

Also, just as a fictional character has wants, needs, fears, and motivations, so do your non-fictional characters. By using a first- or third-person point of view, action verbs, and a show-not-tell writing style you can catapult your readers into the story and help them appreciate the little slice of true life that you are sharing with them.

Here’s an example of a memoir that, while historically accurate, is rather dry:

In 1973, Terry got a job for the local newspaper. She did many jobs while there, such as typesetting, layout and design, and bundling (which is the bundling of flyers, ads, and other inserts with the paper). However, her favorite job was junior reporter.

Her first really major story involved the murder of a local schoolteacher. When the body was discovered, Terry was at the school to cover the latest protests.

Here is that same example, but written in a more story-like way:

1973 was a tumultuous year. It was the time of flower power, (Viet Nam) war protests, hippies dropping out, dropping in, and dropping acid, flag and bra burnings, and it was the year that Terry saw her first murder victim.

As a junior reporter for the local paper, she was at the school covering the latest protest when the screams ripped through the air.

 

Now, which memoir would you rather read?

It’s Now Free on Amazon, too!

Amazon.com finally caught up with the other distributors, so now you can get Mastering Meditation free for your Kindle, too. Try some of the different meditations from the book, and see which of them works for you.

Do you wonder what types of lives you might have lived previously, or what lives you might live in the future? Using the regression and progression meditation techniques included in the book can help you find out. The book also contains some examples of past and future life memories.

So, download your free copy today, and happy reading! (Please don’t forget to write up a review and post it ; )

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Cover Design by DL-Designs and Digital Art

The Next Taylor Caldwell?

My Life as a PsychopompWriting a novel is a maddening, magical, and mind-bending experience. It’s a mystical journey that can take you anywhere and nowhere. It’s a journey that can go on for eons, or it can last only moments. When you’re enjoying the experience, it’s heaven; but when the characters won’t talk to you, it can be hell.

My novel began 25 years ago (yep, you read that right–I started this journey 25 years ago), while involved in some meditation classes and past life review sessions. As stated in my book Escorting the Dead: My Life as a Psychopomp  (gotta get those plugs in), I have a knack for being able to read other people’s past lives from their auras; however, I could never easily read my own. But as I learned different types of meditations, I was able to bring out details of some of my own past lives.

I recorded the details and followed the path of the stories that I found. The paths led me to other people that I knew, but who had also been part of my “pasts”. So, from reading their auras I got more details and, many times, a totally different perspective on the incidents. I scribbled snippets of dialogue, I dashed out descriptions of scenes and character interactions, and I began to formulate an idea for a story to weave all these disparate bits and pieces of past life memories together.

In my naivete, I thought I might be the next Taylor Caldwell. While growing up, I had read nearly every book she ever wrote; her stories were brilliant and had felt so authentic. She knew so many details about each of the time periods she wrote about. Yet, when asked about the amount of research that she must have done to imbue each of her stories with so much realism, she denied it. She said that she just knew what was right for each story because she could see it in her mind’s eye. She claimed that most of her research was in regard to the events of the period and the placing of those events in the proper sequence.

She was a brilliant writer, and very clever. So, it seemed less than surprising to learn (years later) that her historical fictions were a combination of her past life memories and her ability to write a story. But, as I would learn, it takes more than being able to “read” auras and discern past life memories to create a story, let alone a novel. There’s a fair bit of story telling ability needed, too. Oh, and let us not forget the ability to write…a small matter that so many of today’s wanna-be-authors seem to feel is unimportant. And while I admit that spelling and grammar can be a bloody pain in the keester, they do make it so much easier on the reader.

Recognizing that I had a lot more work to do wasn’t easy. I’m not always a very patient person. All I saw was that I had the makings of some great stories; great stories that I truly felt others needed to see and share, too. However, 25 years ago was long before the age of the blog or other social media outlets. In fact, PCs were not something that everyone had, and the internet and email were barely out of their infancy. So, unless I could pull my stories into some cohesive book or collection of short stories, no one was going to see them except me (oh, and probably my hubby). And so began the greatest adventure of my life…learning to be a writer, an author, and a novelist.

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How do you know?

How can you “remember” your past or future lives? How do you know what other realities you have, are, or will be participating in? For me, it’s always been easy to see. But with a little practice, it can be easy for anyone.

You see, we all “carry around” our own pasts, like books on tape they’re recorded within our soul. To “read” these books you just need to focus your energies (your self) on that chakra where the recordings are stored.

When I do that, I get short movie-type segments that play out in my mind—like waking dreams, but clearer. I liken it to watching a movie through a gauzy curtain, though sometimes the curtain isn’t there at all, in which case I can see the action and characters quite clearly.

Many times the conversations (if there are any) take place in the native language (in other words, if the memory is from Loir, France, then the language spoken is French). Yet, even though the characters are speaking their native language, I can understand them. It’s as if the meaning of the words is going straight to my brain, so I’m hearing the meaning of the conversation rather than the words of the conversation.

Rarely are there any literal signs to tell me when and where the memory is from. Usually, I have to try to match the mode of apparel and hair styles to a period of time, then try to match the language with a location. Sometimes the location is just “known” by me (the current me) but I still need to match the clothing and hair styles with the era. That’s why sometimes the era is noted by me as being between 1200-1300 AD, because the clothing worn is so generic (European peasantry didn’t have much in the way of style back then) that it’s difficult to match any closer.

Sometimes I’ll see something within the memory image that will be a large help (such as a crest on the side of a coach), and sometimes there is little to note, other than grass-covered hills in a springtime countryside. Without the players there I would have never identified the countryside as being in Asia (more specifically Japan), but several of the players were wearing the clothing of Shindo monks, which gave me the time period—feudal Japan.

The most common method I use for linking in and viewing some of my pasts (or possible futures) is meditation. The one I like best for this type of viewing is a focused meditation. You focus on your second and third chakras (the ones by your belly button and just below your genitals), because this is where the memories are stored.

When I first started, I would get quick flashes, like lightning flashing on a kaleidoscope of photographs. However, as I was able to hold my focus for longer periods of time, I found myself able to move from photographs to fragments of moving pictures. Even these fragments of movement, though, usually came without sound—perhaps a flash of insight (such as knowing where or when). But it wasn’t until it became full blown videos that the “sound” also began to work, and I would hear the conversations and arguments of these memories.

If you’re not into meditation, and I know a lot of people aren’t, you can focus on your pasts or futures just before falling asleep. This allows you to use your dreams as the window through which you can view your pasts and futures. Just before falling asleep, repeat to yourself that you want to the past or future that is having the most influence on your current life. This will trigger you (most times, anyway) to “remember”. Of course, you need to wake yourself up immediately following the memory replay so that you can write it down, just as you would with any other dream. But I think you’ll see the difference between the “memory” and normal dreams.

While dreams rarely make sense, and are usually non-linear in their “stories”, a memory will make sense and it will tell a logical, linear story. Most of us retain the memories of very emotional or traumatic events (which most of the time is the death sequence of the previous life). Many times this can be when the previous person we were died, but other times it can be some other event—a betrayal by lover, friend, co-worker, can be very emotional, so may appear; the los of a loved one, whether child, friend, spouse, etc. can be very emotional and may appear as a memory; or the loss of a major opportunity (especially if it will cause a major change in our lives or major regrets) can be “dreamed” about.

Think about your own life, and the types of memories you have—aren’t they all extremely emotional? Someone you loved, admired, or held in great esteem did something nice for you; a day when something happened that greatly embarrassed you; the horrible argument you had with a friend over 10 years ago; the time you got cheated out of your last dollar by someone. See, those are the types of things that stay in your memory—the emotional things. So, when you delve into your pasts or futures, those are also the types of memories you will find—the emotional ones.

Another way to open yourself up to remembering your pasts, is to look to your current life. Do you have a penchant for African art when all your other tastes are extremely modern? There’s probably a life connection with Africa. Do you find yourself decorating your house with hints of Ancient Egypt—a statue of Isis, an ankh, maybe just some wallpaper border with hieroglyphs on it? Perhaps you spent a life in and around that area during that time period. Perhaps you find that learning a particular language comes easily, while any other language is very difficult? Did you find it easy to learn Russian, but couldn’t figure out French or Spanish to save your soul? Maybe it’s because you’re connecting with a life spent in Russia or the Ukraine.

So if you’re really interested in finding out about your other lives, there are many ways to do it. There are hypno-therapists who will help you regress and remember, there are auric readers who can probably help you remember, but mostly there’s yourself. You have the recordings, you just need to “listen” to them.

Can you hear me…

My husband and I have spent the past few months searching for a home to rent. I was determined to use my “instincts” this time rather than my intellect. Following my intellect and overriding emotions is what had led us to be in this position of needing to find a rental, and I was intent on allowing my inner voice lead us this time.

When my husband and I moved to our current location I had pushed away the little voice that kept hollering at me. It kept saying that we needed to wait, not buy; we needed to rent an apartment or something and maybe buy something later. But rather than listen to that voice, I opted to go with my husband’s choice of moving once. So we purchased a home only to have the home values erode leaving us underwater with no life preservers.

After watching the home values plummet and the neighborhood collapse, we, too, finally succumbed to the realization that we could no longer maintain a home that was so far underwater. So, with a short sale on the verge of completion, I began hunting for some place for us to move to. However, it seems that the majority of people in our area were also trying to rent, either because they had also left homes they could no longer support or because they didn’t trust the housing market and refused to invest in it. Either way, competition was stiff.

The limited rental market, combined with the lack of a finalized closing date on our own home sale left me scrambling and my emotions running high. The heightened emotions were doing a wonderful job at blocking that inner voice that I swore I was going to listen to. Instead, all I could hear was “Grab it! Get it! There might not be anything else!”

With this overly emotional voice of panic screaming at me, it became difficult to be intuitive let alone logical about finding a place to live. We traipsed through places so filthy that I would have never even gotten out of the car to view them, let alone considered renting them had it not been for that screaming voice of panic. Call after call was made, never to be returned, or if returned, it was by a rude, and oftentimes snotty realtor or leasing agent who could care less about my plight. Most often the response was the same, “It’s rented already.” followed by them hanging up. (And this after the house, apartment, or condo had been on the market for only 3 or 4 days.)

I was, therefore, suspicious when I viewed some images online of a place for rent and felt a wrenching in my gut that said, “I recognize that place.” I looked at them again, and re-read the description of the home. My husband and I had never been in the community, so I know we had never seen the house, yet there it was again…that pull of recognition. Although the days on the rental market read 20, I called fully expecting that if I got to speak to anyone they would tell me that the place was already rented.

When the leasing agent called back, she was less than friendly, but not overtly rude. She pointed out that the place was in a 55+ community, as if she expected me to go “Oh sorry…” and hang up. Instead, I responded that both my husband and I were qualified, and suddenly her demeanor changed. We agreed on a time and date to view the home and when we walked inside, that pull of recognition was even stronger.

Because the voice of panic was also still there, I disbelieved my inner voice and I stressed and worried while our credit and work histories were checked and our references were reviewed, all the while expecting to hear them say, “sorry, your credit score sucks…” or “sorry, the owner has found someone else…”. Instead, we got a call from the leasing agent stating that the owner actually understood and empathised with our situation and was quite willing to give us a go.

I couldn’t believe it. Despite the inner voice, despite the instant recognition of the place via the pictures, I was still shocked. It made me realize that no matter how strong your “talents”, you can still be fooled; you can still end up following the voice of panic or other highly charged emotions. Luckily for us, I was trying to listen for the inner voice, so even though the emotions tried to drown it out, I did manage to hear it. But if I hadn’t been listening, or if my doubts had won out, my husband and I could still be struggling to find a place to live.

We all need to make an effort to listen to that inner voice and not let the sounds of our own highly charged emotions drown it out. We need to believe that the path is there if we can just calm down enough to find it. Hopefully, that lesson has burned its way into my brain and I won’t have such difficulties next time listening to, hearing, and following that inner voice.