What is real?

Near death experiences…what are they really? Most people who have near death experiences feel that they truly left their bodies. Some even feel that they traveled beyond this Earthly existence to another place (heaven, the astral plane, somewhere). However, some scientists and medical experts claim that these sensations and experiences are nothing more than the misfirings of the brain caused by the lack of oxygen and the chemicals released by our bodies as we begin to shut down into death.

So, is there something more beyond the physical realm, or is it just our own body’s reactions that we experience when we die?

I’m no expert, but I’ve had at least 1 NDE myself. When I combine that with what I’ve experienced as a planer, I’m pretty confident in my beliefs. I know that what I recognize as “me” is much more than this physical body. I know that my soul (awareness, consciousness, Ka, the sentient portion of who I am) will continue even when the physical form is no longer functioning (dead). But, just like those who have had near death experiences, I have no “proof” other than what I remember of my planer and out of body experiences. Unfortunately, those folks of a more scientific nature discount memories of these types of incidents because they can’t measure and quantify them. Memories, like rainbows, can’t be captured, bottled, tested and measured.

Some scientific and medical experts have tried to recreate near death experiences using a type of virtual reality, while others have tried to induce it through chemical means. However, because these experts have not experienced the bright light, the visions of ghostly loved ones, or the feelings of expansiveness and all encompassing love, they refuse to believe in the possibility of another reality, a reality where physical bodies are not needed, a reality where consciousness and awareness exist without physicality.

They insist that since they can only measure what is happening within the physical mind and body, that all those feelings and visions are nothing more than hallucinations, self-deception based on expectations and beliefs, or are created by chemical imbalances within the mind as the body prepares itself for death. But they have not yet figured out how to measure awareness or consciousness, and if they can’t measure or recognize this fundamental aspect of humanness, how can they say for certain that life cannot exist outside of the physical body? How can they be certain that what the mind remembers during death (or rather, near death) are the memories or experiences of the soul (consciousness and awareness) as it is leaving the body, yet is still connected to the body?

After all, all of life is lived within the brain and mind, so to say something is not real because it only exists within our mind, is to say that nothing is real. I think these scientists and medical experts who refuse to even consider the possibility that consciousness and awareness can exist beyond the physical body, are so limited by their own fears that they will never “believe” or “prove” that there is life beyond the death of the physical body. At least not until they die and see it for themselves.

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How do you know?

How can you “remember” your past or future lives? How do you know what other realities you have, are, or will be participating in? For me, it’s always been easy to see. But with a little practice, it can be easy for anyone.

You see, we all “carry around” our own pasts, like books on tape they’re recorded within our soul. To “read” these books you just need to focus your energies (your self) on that chakra where the recordings are stored.

When I do that, I get short movie-type segments that play out in my mind—like waking dreams, but clearer. I liken it to watching a movie through a gauzy curtain, though sometimes the curtain isn’t there at all, in which case I can see the action and characters quite clearly.

Many times the conversations (if there are any) take place in the native language (in other words, if the memory is from Loir, France, then the language spoken is French). Yet, even though the characters are speaking their native language, I can understand them. It’s as if the meaning of the words is going straight to my brain, so I’m hearing the meaning of the conversation rather than the words of the conversation.

Rarely are there any literal signs to tell me when and where the memory is from. Usually, I have to try to match the mode of apparel and hair styles to a period of time, then try to match the language with a location. Sometimes the location is just “known” by me (the current me) but I still need to match the clothing and hair styles with the era. That’s why sometimes the era is noted by me as being between 1200-1300 AD, because the clothing worn is so generic (European peasantry didn’t have much in the way of style back then) that it’s difficult to match any closer.

Sometimes I’ll see something within the memory image that will be a large help (such as a crest on the side of a coach), and sometimes there is little to note, other than grass-covered hills in a springtime countryside. Without the players there I would have never identified the countryside as being in Asia (more specifically Japan), but several of the players were wearing the clothing of Shindo monks, which gave me the time period—feudal Japan.

The most common method I use for linking in and viewing some of my pasts (or possible futures) is meditation. The one I like best for this type of viewing is a focused meditation. You focus on your second and third chakras (the ones by your belly button and just below your genitals), because this is where the memories are stored.

When I first started, I would get quick flashes, like lightning flashing on a kaleidoscope of photographs. However, as I was able to hold my focus for longer periods of time, I found myself able to move from photographs to fragments of moving pictures. Even these fragments of movement, though, usually came without sound—perhaps a flash of insight (such as knowing where or when). But it wasn’t until it became full blown videos that the “sound” also began to work, and I would hear the conversations and arguments of these memories.

If you’re not into meditation, and I know a lot of people aren’t, you can focus on your pasts or futures just before falling asleep. This allows you to use your dreams as the window through which you can view your pasts and futures. Just before falling asleep, repeat to yourself that you want to the past or future that is having the most influence on your current life. This will trigger you (most times, anyway) to “remember”. Of course, you need to wake yourself up immediately following the memory replay so that you can write it down, just as you would with any other dream. But I think you’ll see the difference between the “memory” and normal dreams.

While dreams rarely make sense, and are usually non-linear in their “stories”, a memory will make sense and it will tell a logical, linear story. Most of us retain the memories of very emotional or traumatic events (which most of the time is the death sequence of the previous life). Many times this can be when the previous person we were died, but other times it can be some other event—a betrayal by lover, friend, co-worker, can be very emotional, so may appear; the los of a loved one, whether child, friend, spouse, etc. can be very emotional and may appear as a memory; or the loss of a major opportunity (especially if it will cause a major change in our lives or major regrets) can be “dreamed” about.

Think about your own life, and the types of memories you have—aren’t they all extremely emotional? Someone you loved, admired, or held in great esteem did something nice for you; a day when something happened that greatly embarrassed you; the horrible argument you had with a friend over 10 years ago; the time you got cheated out of your last dollar by someone. See, those are the types of things that stay in your memory—the emotional things. So, when you delve into your pasts or futures, those are also the types of memories you will find—the emotional ones.

Another way to open yourself up to remembering your pasts, is to look to your current life. Do you have a penchant for African art when all your other tastes are extremely modern? There’s probably a life connection with Africa. Do you find yourself decorating your house with hints of Ancient Egypt—a statue of Isis, an ankh, maybe just some wallpaper border with hieroglyphs on it? Perhaps you spent a life in and around that area during that time period. Perhaps you find that learning a particular language comes easily, while any other language is very difficult? Did you find it easy to learn Russian, but couldn’t figure out French or Spanish to save your soul? Maybe it’s because you’re connecting with a life spent in Russia or the Ukraine.

So if you’re really interested in finding out about your other lives, there are many ways to do it. There are hypno-therapists who will help you regress and remember, there are auric readers who can probably help you remember, but mostly there’s yourself. You have the recordings, you just need to “listen” to them.